Structures – Missing Word worksheet

Structures – Worksheet

A structure provides ………………….. A structure must be able to support its own weight and whatever ……………load is put on it.

Structures can be divided into two groups; frame structure sand shell structures.

  • FRAME STRUCTURES are made up of separate strips which are fixed together to make a framework. An example of a frame structure is called a ……………………
  • SHELL STRUCTURES have a single, continuous ……………….. which supports the weight of the thing inside. An example of a shell structure is a drinks……….

FORCES

When you sit on a chair, the force or ……………………….. you put on it is called …………………. force. Inside the chair are forces called ………………. internal forces which stop the chair collapsing. If the external forces are greater than the internal force, the chair will ……………… When you are sitting still, the force you apply is also still. This is called a …………….force. When you rock backwards and forwards you apply ……………….. or moving force to the chair.

Forces are not all the same. Forces can press, pull, twist or bend. If we take a material or material and try and squash it, we can say that it is in ………………….

If we take a material and try to pull it apart from either end we are putting it into ……………….

When you twist the top of a bottle or jar to open it you are using ……………………. This is  a turning or twisting ……………. When you use  a spanner to tighten or undo a nut, you are using torsion.

When one force is balanced by another they are said  to be in …………………….. A structure in which the forces are balanced stays in one position, neither falling down or moving.

TRIANGULATION

Structures are made up of individual parts called ………………… These are under tension or compression. ………………….. forces can occur where members are joined. A member under tension is called a ……………, a member under compression is called a ………………. Ties may be made of string or rope, but struts must be …………………

Triangles are very useful when building …………………. They can make it very strong and ……………… A basic four sided frame can lean if a ……….. is put on from one side. It needs to be………..

One way of making this structure more rigid would be to put in one or two more parts or ………… going from corner to corner. This way of making structures more …………………… is called …………………… It is often used when building bridges or cranes.

Use the words listed below to fill in the blanks – some words appear twice.

CAN, COLLAPSE, COMPRESSION, CRANE, DYNAMIC, EQUILIBRIUM, EXTERNAL, FORCE, INTERNAL, LOAD, LOAD, MEMBERS, MEMBERS, MOVING, PRESSURE, RIGID, RIGID, SHEAR, SKIN, STABILISED, STABLE STRUCTURES, STRUT, STATIC, SUPPORT, TENSION, TIE, TORSION, TRIANGULATION.

ANSWERS in order

support, load, crane, skin, can, pressure, external, internal, collapse, static, dynamic, compression, tension, torsion, force, equilibrium, moving, members, shear, tie, strut, rigid, structures, stable, load, stabilised, members, rigid, triangulation.

THINGS have gone from bad to worse for Torfaen’s education department in the past year. If you need help Bob or Mary please just ask.

All I can say is what a shame. It had such good foundations and structure what has gone wrong? One person who throughout my life I have aspired to follow is Mary Barnett who has been steadfast about ensuring the right education for the children must be devastated by this news.

http://www.southwalesargus.co.uk/news/gwentnews/10306565.Torfaen_education_goes_into_special_measures/

 

“Greater change and pace are required in order to bring about further improvement.”

It goes on to criticise a failure by the authority to spot underperformance and its impact on learners, and says that: “the authority does not identify clearly for schools, managers and elected members the extent of the improvements required or the pace at which progress is needed.”

Good Old Bob, but why and how did it happen? or are these just the fall guys for a broken education process?

Council leader Bob Wellington and Ms Ward said: “We accept we have fallen short  of our own expectations, the expectations of residents and the minister’s  expectations, for which we apologise.

Read more: Wales Online http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/2013/03/22/council-apologises-for-special-measures-education-91466-33043036/#ixzz2ONXsYDJv

 

Torfaen council leader Bob Wellington told BBC Radio Wales they accepted the report’s findings and were prepared to work with whoever was appointed to help the authority.

“Patently it hasn’t improved enough and it hasn’t gone deep enough, or indeed, been fast enough,” he said.

“We don’t accept that we didn’t make any improvements. In, fact we consider that we had made improvements.

“A lot of people have put a lot of effort in to this, certainly at a managerial level and other levels.

“I think we’ve done everything we can to try and improve, but we recognise that we need external assistance in the same way that the other local authorities that are in the same place are receiving now.”

If you ever need help from me Bob you know you only have to ask. l.foxwell@languageawards.com

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-south-east-wales-21889693

 

 

Embracing bilingualism helps school achieve Good OFSTED report.

What great news that a school in Peterborough has improved so greatly in the past months that OFSTED have now deemed them as good. So remarkable that news papers Peterborough Today and the Daily Mail and even the radio station R2 have today run the story.

 

Readers of this blog will not be surprised that by embracing bilingualism and using it to benefit your teaching improves and speeds up the rate that the pupils learn English. I have gathered information about its benefits and the results are now starting to come through. The head teacher clearly supports this view of bilingualism and her results show that by embracing it results can be improved quickly. I believe this is the start of the educational culture change which so many schools and LA officers were resisting up until a year or so ago.

 

Head Christine Parker, 54, said: ‘More and more  of the world is  going bilingual. The culture at our school is not to see  bilingualism as  a difficulty.’

I am also hopeful that this great result will also make sure that gone are the conversations littered with  I only have one or two! or what can I do I don’t speak their language? as an excuse is changing. Gone and evidently going are the teachers plodding along teaching what is comfortable for them in such a way that it takes longer than necessary for the children to pick up the language.  Children pick up social language quite easily and it is the schools job to ensure the curriculum is taught and academic language is known and understood. In the future we should now be able to say that  Every Student does Matter.

There will be difficulties along the way as the head describes here;

‘Sometimes parents have tried to help  their  children learn English but their own isn’t too good,’ she said.  ‘The outcome is  the children aren’t fluent in their own language. If  they haven’t got a good  foundation [in their own language] it can be  very difficult to build on  that.’

but by sharing and supporting each other we can ensure that this becomes the reality.

 

Welsh children should all have a chance at bilingualism

Further to my post last week I see this press report from Wales Online again about ESTYN’s findings and the writer supports my belief that we should encourage bilingualism but the policy and strategy for ensuring this including the training of teachers with the level of Welsh needed to be more fluent in English-speaking Welsh schools.

As a parent I for one was pleased that Welsh schools were embraced and that I had the choice of sending my child to a Welsh-speaking school even though English was our main family language. Just as important for my other family members was the choice not to send their child to a  Welsh school but to and English school that taught Welsh. I am sure this is still a really good compromise for most of the Welsh people.

This is just food for thought unless everyone just speaks Welsh in Wales then dual language and the balance between the two must always be measured against the needs of the children and society and not a group that wishes just to promote the language.  Whilst there is a place for this they can alienate if they try to impose their wish. My family members are mainly happy that they speak English and have no wish for their children to learn Welsh apart from an awareness of it and an acceptance of bilingualism.

The report finishes on these notes to which I totally agree.

Whatever action the minister decides to take on the basis of the findings, he  needs to ensure that the excellent work done by his Government doesn’t slip  between the cracks.

 

The Welsh-Medium Education Strategy is a case in point, as are the powers in  the School Standards and Organisation Bill. At long last, the framework is in  place to hold local authorities to account in terms of their Welsh education  strategies – so please, let’s not abandon ship now.

 

For those still young enough to soak it up, to those of us a little more  advanced in our years, including all school staff, the support needs to be in  place to give everybody the opportunity to grasp bilingualism with both  hands.

Read more: Wales Online http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/education-news/2013/01/31/all-must-have-chanceto-grasp-bilingualism-91466-32713956/#ixzz2JdY5Kj5I

 

 

Speech Translation Technology moves forward

Going back a few years John talked about being able to talk to people from all different languages like in Star Trek. At the time it seemed so far fetched that most thought it was not a possibility, and often their lack of foresight hindered his vision. He wanted to be able to speak in English yet the people to understand in their home language. As teachers this would be so invaluable when we have new arrivals to our classrooms.  We haven’t time to wait for an interpreter or translator to arrive, most schools do not have the finances to have a qualified teacher who is also a native speaker so cheaper and simple solutions are sought daily as people move around globally more now than ever.

It is really good to see that Microsoft are nearer to this goal than ever before.  The good stuff it at around 7.05 where he speaks in English and out comes Chinese

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Nu-nlQqFCKg

As Dr. Rashid’s post explains in detail, this demo is less of a breakthrough than an evolutionary step, representing a new version of a long-established combination of three gradually-improving technologies: Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR), Machine Translation (MT), and speech synthesis (no appropriate standard acronym, though TTS for “text to speech” is close).

In 1986, when the money from the privatization of NTT was used to found the Advanced Telecommunication Research (ATR) Institute in Japan, the centerpiece of ATR’s prospectus was the Interpreting Telephony Laboratory. As explained in Tsuyoshi Morimoto, “Automatic Interpreting Telephone Research at ATR“, Proceedings of a Workshop on Machine Translation, 1990:

An automatic telephone interpretation system will transform a spoken dialogue from the speaker’s language  to the listener’s  automatically  and simultaneously. It will undoubtedly be used to overcome language barriers and facilitate communication among the people of the world.

ATR Interpreting Telephony Research project was started in 1986. The objective is to promote basic research for developing an automatic telephone interpreting system. The project period is seven-years.

As of 1986, all of the constituent technologies had been in development for 25 or 30 years. But none of them were really ready for general use in an unrestricted conversational setting, and so the premise of the ATR Interpreting Telephony Laboratory was basically a public-relations device for framing on-going speech technology research, not a plausible R&D project. And so it’s not surprising that the ATR Interpreting Telephony Laboratory completed its seven-year term without producing practical technology — though quite a bit of valuable and interesting speech technology research was accomplished, including important contributions to the type of speech synthesis algorithm used in the Microsoft demo.

In the 26 years since 1986, there have been two crucial changes: Moore’s Law has made computers bigger and faster but smaller and cheaper; and speech recognition, machine translation, and speech synthesis have all gotten gradually better.  In both the domain of devices and the domain of algorithms, the developments have been evolutionary rather than revolutionary — the reaction of a well-informed researcher from the late 1980s, transplanted to 2012, would be satisfaction and admiration at the clever ways that familiar devices and algorithms have been improved, not baffled amazement at completely unexpected inventions.

All of the constituent technologies — ASR, MT, speech synthesis — have improved to the point where we all encounter them in everyday life, and some people use them all the time. I’m not sure whether Interpreting Telephony’s time has finally come, but it’s clearly close.

In any case, the folks at Microsoft Research are at or near the leading edge in pushing forward all of the constituent technologies for speech-to-speech translation, and Rashid’s speech-to-speech demo is an excellent way to publicise that fact.

Preparing my child for secondary education

For all of you who are parents of children moving ‘big school’.

kipmcgrathashford

Preparing my child for secondary education.

This is a most fabulous blog from Clare and Martin Rimmer of Kip McGrath Lisburn about the process of transferring to Secondary School.

As the father of a daughter moving to Grammar School in September it has been invaluable.

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NQT – Help I have an interview …What shall I do?

This time of year reminds me of my degree show, just as I was preparing for it I was called to the professors office as there was a phone call for me. I was being invited to a job interview which was two days away and this just coincided with the middle day of my degree show and examinations. My mind went mad what should I do first, how can I get both things done? Luckily on that particular day I only had one verbal test which the professor changed to the day before, so off I went…luckily I was chosen and my teaching career was started.

If you are in the same place here is some advice particularly for language interviews.

  • If you have any questions ring up or email  to clarify  the position
  • Where possible find out about prior learning
  • Are you co-ordinating languages as part of the position?
  • Know the up to date curriculum and where appropriate suggest exemplar lessons to support any changes.
  • Find out the year group you will be teaching and relate the curriculum to this group including, aims and objectives.
  • Think about objections e.g. some parents and teachers think teaching a child another language rather than English is the wrong thing to do so will do all they can to object…how can you over come this?
  • What is the heads view?
  • Know the benefits of MFL or EAL especially that: good practice for MFL/EAL  is good practice for everything else.  (Many benefits of bilingual learning are now to be found on this blog and the internet)
  • Most importantly enjoy what you are doing.  If you enjoy it, your enthusiasm comes across and the children enjoy their learning.
  • This is probably one people will say you shouldnt say that, it is obvious, but having been in the position of interviewer, here goes.  Wear appropriate clothing for the demonstration lesson you want to deliver thereby show your professional clothing choice. Some people plan e.g. a walk around the grounds in trousers that drag in the ground, shoes that are unsuitable for walking and then are uncomfortable throughout the rest of the interview.  Both themselves and the interviewer do not feel they have got the best out of each other.

If part of the interview is the demonstration lesson, try to find out the normal expectations e.g. are the aims clearly shown, is the three-part lesson expected, the number in the class, the age group. What they would normally doing is a good place to start …if you have no ideas…because you could support current learning. Find out what they expect via lesson planning and if possible use their normal proforma – showing that you could fit right in helps. Know where what you are doing fits in the curriculum and what could come before or after it.

In some situations you may be starting off MFL or EAL in the school for the first time…unlikely but it has been known… in this case be aware that governors may want to ask questions re the curriculum and what you hope the MFL/EAL curriculum to look like in thats chool in say three-five years once you have embedded your ideas.  As I said more likely for a full co-ordinators role or Head of Department role, but it aware it can happen. For example just because there was a member of staff in the school when the job was advertised who was to be the co-ordinator, it doesn’t mean they will be there when you take up position for all sorts of reasons.

Finally make sure you enter the primary language awards and show off all of your good work. www.languageawards.com or facebook primarylanguageawards.