EAL or SEN? You decide

At last Rona and I have completed our handy practical guide to help and support you as teachers through the … are they just EAL or SEN or both? minefield.

Bang up to date with the curriculum and SEN changes for the 2014/15 academic year which sees the age range higher and the introduction of a new acronym SEMH which we will all have to be familiar with not just the SENCO or EAL TA.

 

 

A practical guide to supporting EAL and SEN learners

A practical guide to supporting EAL and SEN learners

Structured around current legislation it gives practical support to support you in your decision making as to whether they are naughty children just trying it on or have a need that is currently not supported.

Great for new teachers or experienced alike.

Contents page EAL SEN

Contents page EAL SEN

 

For a full copy of the SEND code go to –

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/342440/SEND_Code_of_Practice_approved_by_Parliament_29.07.14.pdf

For a copy of the e book priced at £15.00 (not including p and p) contact lsbooksinfo@gmail.com. Printed copies available soon.

back cover

 

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NEW SEN code of Practice

I am busily writing, writing and soon to be publishing an easy to read practical book about SEN (D) with the lovely and very knowledgeable Dr Rona  Tutt using this latest guidance as the starter. Our aim of the book was to firstly support all teachers in recognising when to consider SEN but also when EAL needs stop and SEN starts. It’s quite a blurry line and many teachers just do not know where to start so this news story #SEND: ow.ly/zI4FL is a great starting point to firstly find out about the changes but also to understand what the code is expecting of teachers.

I will be writing more about the book when it is ready to be published hopefully in the next month or two… so watch this space.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/send-code-of-practice-0-to-25  for the new code of practice

Structures – Missing Word worksheet

Structures – Worksheet

A structure provides ………………….. A structure must be able to support its own weight and whatever ……………load is put on it.

Structures can be divided into two groups; frame structure sand shell structures.

  • FRAME STRUCTURES are made up of separate strips which are fixed together to make a framework. An example of a frame structure is called a ……………………
  • SHELL STRUCTURES have a single, continuous ……………….. which supports the weight of the thing inside. An example of a shell structure is a drinks……….

FORCES

When you sit on a chair, the force or ……………………….. you put on it is called …………………. force. Inside the chair are forces called ………………. internal forces which stop the chair collapsing. If the external forces are greater than the internal force, the chair will ……………… When you are sitting still, the force you apply is also still. This is called a …………….force. When you rock backwards and forwards you apply ……………….. or moving force to the chair.

Forces are not all the same. Forces can press, pull, twist or bend. If we take a material or material and try and squash it, we can say that it is in ………………….

If we take a material and try to pull it apart from either end we are putting it into ……………….

When you twist the top of a bottle or jar to open it you are using ……………………. This is  a turning or twisting ……………. When you use  a spanner to tighten or undo a nut, you are using torsion.

When one force is balanced by another they are said  to be in …………………….. A structure in which the forces are balanced stays in one position, neither falling down or moving.

TRIANGULATION

Structures are made up of individual parts called ………………… These are under tension or compression. ………………….. forces can occur where members are joined. A member under tension is called a ……………, a member under compression is called a ………………. Ties may be made of string or rope, but struts must be …………………

Triangles are very useful when building …………………. They can make it very strong and ……………… A basic four sided frame can lean if a ……….. is put on from one side. It needs to be………..

One way of making this structure more rigid would be to put in one or two more parts or ………… going from corner to corner. This way of making structures more …………………… is called …………………… It is often used when building bridges or cranes.

Use the words listed below to fill in the blanks – some words appear twice.

CAN, COLLAPSE, COMPRESSION, CRANE, DYNAMIC, EQUILIBRIUM, EXTERNAL, FORCE, INTERNAL, LOAD, LOAD, MEMBERS, MEMBERS, MOVING, PRESSURE, RIGID, RIGID, SHEAR, SKIN, STABILISED, STABLE STRUCTURES, STRUT, STATIC, SUPPORT, TENSION, TIE, TORSION, TRIANGULATION.

ANSWERS in order

support, load, crane, skin, can, pressure, external, internal, collapse, static, dynamic, compression, tension, torsion, force, equilibrium, moving, members, shear, tie, strut, rigid, structures, stable, load, stabilised, members, rigid, triangulation.

Being able to bridge the language barrier can save lives and money

Whether you speak one, two or more languages in critical situations it is more important whether you understand one, two or more languages and can communicate.  Whether this is by using the support of translation engines like EMASUK, or interpreters, the most important factor in my view will always be the safety of the child or patient. This is clearly easier to see within the world of  medicine where being able to find with clarity the problem to diagnose quickly and correctly is critical. This is also appropriate in schools where safeguarding, disclosure and again medical information needs to be transmitted from one person to another.

It was therefore nice to see this comment in the Red Orbit News:

Having bilingual staff to serve as medical interpreters can help prevent unnecessary testing and misdiagnosis. And clear, culturally sensitive communication can help produce greater patient compliance, satisfaction and improved health outcomes,” said Firoozeh Vali, PhD, NJHA’s vice president of research.

How language transformed humanity : Mark Pagel

Biologist Mark Pagel shares an intriguing theory about why humans evolved our complex system of language. He suggests that language is a piece of “social technology” that allowed early human tribes to access a powerful new tool: cooperation.
How intriguing, just the opening few lines that suggest we use language to alter someone else’s brain. Great discussion topic.

It is true that we do use cumulative cultural evolution and we can see how things have developed over the years.
‘Social learning is visual theft’ if I watch you I can copy Mark suggests is the way we learnt but 2000 years ago we needed to develop a system of communication to share our ideas and language evolved to solve this crisis.

He says it is social technology for coordinating and striking deals. Language opened up the sphere of co-operation.

Is this how people feel when they move country like a bird without wings? until the language is learnt and they feel whole again and can communicate effectively?

He feels language is the most valuable trade we have for converting new lands and resources. Currently there are 7-8000 languages but the puzzle and irony is that the greatest number of languages is found where people are most tightly packed together. In Papua New Guinea there are 800-1000 distinct different languages and places where you can encounter a new language in under 1 mile. We use language to draw lines around our co-operative groups and to establish identities and to protect our knowledge and skills from eavesdroppers outside. Different languages slow the flow of ideas, technologies and genes. These languages are now a burden in today’s society because they impose a barrier co-operation like in the EU where their translation costs are over 1 billion euros annually on their 23 languages.

Does this mean that languages will eventually die or become extinct, and will it be the survival of the fittest?

If we need to maintain co-operation then maybe our destination is one world, with one language.

What does everyone else think?

K21st - Essential 21st Century Knowledge

Biologist Mark Pagel shares an intriguing theory about why humans evolved our complex system of language. He suggests that language is a piece of “social technology” that allowed early human tribes to access a powerful new tool: cooperation.

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Radio 2 Innovation – EMASUK Hand Held Translator – UK

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To see Rebeccas tweet go to pic.twitter.com/WLUm6BDg

Yesterday we were on the Queens Jubilee train to London, weather brilliant sunshine and one of the best train journeys by the coast.  Arriving in Paddington the hustle and bustle greet us.

After being sent around the BBC building twice we finally find Great Western House and Rebecca meets us. She is welcoming and nice, we chat about the product and decide that John will speak as it is easier if there is only one of us. After a short wait we are on John talks to Rebecca and Simon about the handheld translator and shows it working. As soon as it began it is all over and we are having photos taken with Simon and Rebecca they were both lovely as was everyone esle we met in the team. Strangely one of them lives near to St Chads School where I was Deputy Head for a short while.  Thank You.

See a demo at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DOIckeKwfQ or

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CU3AnuwV24E&feature=channel&list=UL

Find out more at www.emasuk.com or use this link

http://shop.emasuk.com/category-2618.wtl