Year 8 lesson Plan example for lesson 2 – Creative writing – The Granny project

A  SCHOOL                  SCHOOL LOGO

 

Group Year 8 Class T                                                 Date ____21 May ________

 

 

Unit Of Work.  20 Century Drama
Teaching Aim. 

 

To continue to understand the play The Granny ProjectObjectives for board:

To write for a specified audience

 

Learning Outcomes.  (Differentiate learning outcomes  into All pupils will, Most pupils will and Some pupils will). 

All pupils will complete a task

Most pupils will present imaginative work for display

Some pupils will develop ideas

Lesson Content. 

 

 

Main Activity(ies)

 

 

 

 

 

Brain bloom words appropriate for an elderly audience    10 mins 

 

 

Re-read part of the Granny Project

Choose an audience and re-write the play for the specified audience eg, for the elderly, choice of words, longer, flowery old fashioned, bosh to wash in, Frock dress                             35 mins

 

 

 Differentiation

 

 Use of dictionaries, thesaurus, working in pairs

 

  

Extension Work.

 

  

Edit their work, extending sentences using connectives

 

 Plenary

 

 

 

 Share ideas with class                                                      15 mins
  The text Paper Exercise books
LSA (How do LSA’s contribute to the learning process). Not present
Assessment (What strategies are you using to assess learning). Competition 
Key words  Presentation Content Audience
Basic Skills.Literacy, numeracy ICT. R 6 W11
 Date Due Sam Learning (or other ICT resource/platform that creates homework) Homework – Writing 

Friday 28th of May

ICT for Supporting and Developing Writing Skills of EAL Pupils

Just some ideas of ways of using ICT to support literacy.

EAL pupils at all levels need support in attempting independent written tasks. They can be helped by:

* prior modelling of the type of text they are going to produce

* oral rehearsal of what they are going to write

* providing phrases and sentence beginnings, to support the child’s lexicon vocabulary and grammar as well as how sentences and language is structured

* Provide writing frames, to support writing development and knowledge of the correct genre format.

* giving them access to word and, or picture banks to reinforce and extend their vocabulary whilst supporting correct spelling

Use the Pupil Premium to support your vulnerable groups

Use the Pupil Premium to support your vulnerable groups

OFSTED report last week clearly states that“In some schools it was clear to inspectors that the spending was not all focused on the needs of the specific groups for whom it was intended.”

Based on multiple answers provided by 119 school leaders responding to the telephone survey and 142 school leaders responding to additional questions at inspection. The single most commonly given use of Pupil Premium funding was to employ teaching assistants

This is such a shame as schools have an opportunity here to provide more than additional staff with the average school receiving around £39,000. Schools could use the £600 per pupil to improve literacy and maths in the most vulnerable groups, and in most cases support language development of new arrivals and those learners whose English is not their first language at the same time.

John Foxwell Director at EMASUK  has said for months that, ‘for two pupils premium you can support your EAL learners and teachers with our ready-made resources, the ability to create your own personalised worksheets, letters, PowerPoint’s or posters from any of the 61 languages and also speak directly to the children in their home language.  To support the safeguarding policy it is also possible to communicate directly with the learner or parent and keep a copy in your file. Being easy to use by both specialists and non-specialists alike it is not surprising that more schools are beginning to see its benefits.’

John further says that ‘as an addition innovative schools are using the same tools and resources to support their MFL curriculum with both teachers and learners using them to develop their own personalised learning kits suitable for their pupils, in their school.

By using the same resources to listen to pronunciation, and create literacy aids both literacy and mathematical academic language can be learnt in situ. Teachers know from practice and research that a child learns more when the learning is in context.’  And this with the added pressure of literacy and Mathematics being  the focus of the new OFSTED inspections it can only help both the learners and teachers.

In conclusion OFSTED recommends that School leaders, including governing bodies, should ensure that Pupil Premium funding is not simply absorbed into mainstream budgets, but instead is carefully targeted at the designated children. Which I think all teacher and parents alike would have no problem in agreeing with.

To find out more you can contact John at j.foxwell@emasuk.com or on 07525 323219

To see more of the report go to http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/pupil-premium

Leading Educationalists highlight issues with BYOD (Bring Your Own Device/s) in schools?

What do you think about the issue of Bringing your own device into school? 

I was discussing with John (Foxwell) the whole notion of children and teachers taking their digital devices to school to access learning. I think teachers will and do take their devices to make life easier for them. It allows them freedom  to create resources at lunchtime (not that I am suggesting this is a good way forward at all, just realistic that this is what some do), in free time, afterschool and yet be able to use in a jiffy in readiness for their learners.

This then leads directly onto thinking about the children. Many of these are also using devices at home, yet do not always have the opportunity to use their skills or device/s at school. Many are challenging this but where do the teachers and school stand?

I think that many schools will encourage the children to bring their own device/s.I think this is great until the first real problem imagine all is going well and has done for years and  then little Jimmy loses his i-pad.  How does it get replaced?  I still remember with anger the loss of a blue and white Chelsea scarf my nan knitted for me aged 12 which was stolen when I was in PE (mind she did tell me not to take it to school…..but I did). It was costly in terms of her time and the balls of wool but not to the value as these new digital items. I just had to suffer the loss and telling off,  but will parents look to the school for reimbursement if the high value items are stolen on the school’s premises, and what happens when on the way to and from school.

My other issue is the teacher will then need to know everything about apple gadgets and also about any Microsoft gadgets to support learning via the various blended routes that are currently being talked about.  I am not sure this is a reality so where does it leave the learner?

Finally I suggested to John that someone needs to start looking holistically at this, because as more and more teachers and learners get their various devices and applications more will be expected from Education policy.

John rightly suggested that before we can produce a policy there are many issues that have to be thought through, before we can even think about where and when it will be used in the curriculum. Without really thinking these are the first questions that need to be asked and suitable answers found to them before policy can be written.

Q1. Will the children be able to bring their lap top/digital device? If so who is going to insure it?

Q2 Who is going to stop one child swapping it for a better make/model?  Our daughter had her flute swapped condoned by the teacher who swapped hers for one of lesser value and gave it to the other child. What happens if this should occur?

Q3. Who is going to look after the Sim cards and SD Cards? It is easy to take the sim card out of an ipad (for example) and put it into another and use all the pay as you go minutes etc. There is no way of checking this.

Q4. Once the devices are in schools can they access the same network?

Q5. What happens re viruses?

Q6. If they are accessing the internet what are the safeguards that need to be put in place for this?

Q7.How are they going to share the same programs or will parents be asked to fund this.  If the learner hasn’t got the program will they have to download before the class starts? On an apple this means linking to I-tunes which then requires passwords. How do we stop one child accessing i tunes and downloading what they shouldnt like games, or either gifting or being forced to gift things to other children.

This debate will go on but please join in and make suggestions to how we will solve this.