Languages are always needed but what were last years top 10?

After reblogging the T index from I talk you talk languages I decided to do some more research to find out what the index was. It seems that over the years T-Index has created a statistical index that combines the Internet population and its estimated GDP per capita. This in turn assists companies in identifying their target markets and in selecting the right languages to translate their websites. This helps businesses ensure online success and increase localization-derived revenue. as a language learner knowing which are the most sought after languages can improve job prospects globally as well as locally.

For lay people like myself interested in languages. looking at the language needs on a  world basis rather than a county, area or country basis opens up a whole new set of questions and also creates a greater awareness of the languages currently most people are using.

The index shows that in 2012 the top 21

2012 Data summary | NEW!

Sort by Country Sort by Language Sort by Region

Trend* Countries T-Index
2012
Projection
2016
Languages Internet population Internet
penetration
GDP p.c. of Int. pop.**

1

USA 22.5% 15.6% 1collapse this section 245,203,319 78.1% $58,751

2

China (!) 13.5% 20.1% 1collapse this section 538,000,000 40.1% $16,133

3

Japan 6.3% 4.6% 1collapse this section 101,228,736 79.5% $39,863

4

Germany 4.6% 3.9% 1collapse this section 67,483,860 83.0% $43,476

5

UK 3.4% 2.6% 1collapse this section 52,731,209 83.6% $41,654
Localizing a website for these 5 markets gives you access to 50% of the worldwide online sales potential.

6

France 3.4% 3.2% 1collapse this section 52,228,905 79.6% $41,580

7

Brazil 3.1% 4.3% 1collapse this section 88,494,756 44.4% $22,265

8

Russia 2.9% 3.6% 1collapse this section 67,982,547 47.7% $27,362

9

South Korea 2.4% 2.1% 1collapse this section 40,329,660 82.5% $37,667

10

Italy 2.3% 1.3% 1collapse this section 35,800,000 58.4% $41,797

11

Canada 2.1% 1.6% 2collapse this section 28,469,069 83.0% $46,743

12

Mexico 2.0% 2.0% 1collapse this section 42,000,000 36.5% $30,078

13

Spain 2.0% 1.8% 2collapse this section 31,606,233 67.2% $39,625

14

India 1.8% 2.3% 2collapse this section 137,000,000 11.4% $8,411

15

Australia 1.4% 1.1% 1collapse this section 19,554,832 88.8% $45,848

16

Turkey 1.3% 1.7% 1collapse this section 36,455,000 45.7% $23,524

17

Taiwan 1.3% 1.1% 1collapse this section 17,530,000 75.4% $48,268

18

Iran (!) 1.2% 1.8% 1collapse this section 42,000,000 53.3% $18,351

19

Netherlands 1.1% 0.93% 1collapse this section 15,549,787 92.9% $45,192

20

Argentina 1.1% 1.4% 1collapse this section 28,000,000 66.4% $24,485

21

Poland 1.0% 1.3% 1collapse this section 24,940,902 64.9% $26,889

see more at – http://www.translated.net/en/languages-that-matter

If however we look at 2005 it tells a different story and shows how the world is developing. China for example is lower down the list and the UK is higher consistent with the world trend of Chinese manufacturing being more dominant in today’s world.

T-Index data summary 2005

Sort by language Sort by country Sort by region

Countries T-Index Cumulative
T-Index
Languages Internet population Internet penetration GDP p.c. of Int. pop.*
 

Here is their prediction for 2015.Unsurprisingly China is now greater and the UK has fallen way behind.

2015 projection of the 10 langauges with the highest potential for online sales.

1 USA 33.9% 33.891% 1collapse this section 203,576,811 68.8 % $54,872
2 Japan 8.9% 42.809% 1collapse this section 78,050,000 61.3 % $37,663
3 Germany 5.7% 48.504% 1collapse this section 47,127,725 57.2 % $39,833
4 UK 4.9% 53.440% 1collapse this section 37,800,000 62.5 % $43,041
5 France 3.6% 57.074% 1collapse this section 25,614,899 42.2 % $46,759
6 Italy 3.6% 60.664% 1collapse this section 28,870,000 49.7 % $40,989
7 China (!) 3.1% 63.729% 1collapse this section 103,000,000 7.9 % $9,807
8 Canada 2.9% 66.582% 2collapse this section 20,450,000 62.3 % $45,988
9 South Korea 2.8% 69.381% 1collapse this section 32,570,000 67.0 % $28,325
10 Spain 2.2% 71.552% 2collapse this section 16,129,731 40.0 % $44,370
11 Russia (!) 2.0% 73.518% 1collapse this section 22,300,000 15.5 % $29,051
12 Mexico 1.8% 75.333% 1collapse this section 16,995,400 16.0 % $35,207
13 Australia 1.8% 77.146% 1collapse this section 13,991,612 69.6 % $42,698
14 Brazil 1.7% 78.838% 1collapse this section 22,320,000 12.0 % $24,993
15 Taiwan 1.5% 80.385% 1collapse this section 13,800,000 60.3 % $36,954
16 Netherlands 1.4% 81.834% 1collapse this section 10,806,328 65.9 % $44,186
17 Turkey (!) 0.84% 82.677% 1collapse this section 10,220,000 14.7 % $27,181
18 Poland 0.80% 83.477% 1collapse this section 10,600,000 27.5 % $24,901
19 Sweden 0.79% 84.272% 1collapse this section 6,800,000 75.5 % $38,509
20 Belgium 0.70% 84.976% 2collapse this section 5,100,000 49.2 % $45,480
21 Switzerland 0.68% 85.651% 3collapse this section 4,836,671 64.6 % $46,05

Studying through the medium of Welsh will mean students will have mastered important transferable skills in both languages which are beneficial in an increasingly competitive employment market.

Businesses are increasingly beginning to see the benefit of bilingual education for their future employers, hence the importance of the ability to study bilingually at the University of Glamorgan.

http://www.caerphillyobserver.co.uk/news/681861/welsh-medium-provision-at-glamorgan-business-school/

Business students at the University of Glamorgan’s Business School will able to study bilingually for the first time this year.

From September, students will have the opportunity to study some modules through the medium of Welsh.

Glamorgan Business School has a dedicated Welsh-medium lecturer who is tasked with developing this provision in South East Wales.

The post, held by Heledd Bebb, is one of the first lecturing posts funded by the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol to raise demand and develop Welsh medium provision.

Further Welsh medium provision will be developed at Glamorgan over the next few years and by 2014, a third of the business course each year will be available through the medium of Welsh.

Students studying two modules a year in business through the medium of Welsh are eligible for the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol’s incentive scholarships – worth £1,500 over three years.

Ms Bebb said: “Studying business through the medium of Welsh brings a whole host of benefits to the student. In both the private and public sector in Wales, demand for Welsh-medium skills in areas such as marketing, human resources and management is increasing.

“The recent Welsh Language Measure, passed in 2012,  by the Welsh Government, will only increase the need for businesses to provide services through the medium of Welsh. Studying part of their course through the medium of Welsh will mean that students will have mastered important transferable skills in both languages which could prove beneficial in an increasingly competitive employment market.”

” renewed focus on language skills at school is needed” John Longworth, Director General of the British Chambers of Commerce

Sometimes when engaged purely in Education it is easier to forget the wider world and the wider implications of why were are teaching a particular subject.  I was always aware being a secondary teacher that my students would possibly be working in Design, Programming,Engineering or Architectural type areas, not least because as well as teaching GCSE, A Level there was always NVQ teaching of skills that was part of my teaching role.  However for some they never think beyond the next exam and in primary often thought only about primary tests and not about the whole child and their future prospects.

With that in mind I thought that this information may be of use for those looking outside the box for reasons that languages should be taught and bilingualism and multilingualism should be embraced.

This is current from the Norfolk Chamber of Trade and shares the benefits to businesses about the importance of communicating with exporters in their language. Here is the link to the article:

http://www.norfolkchamber.co.uk/export/export-news/boost-exports-further-improving-businesses-language-skills-and-international

I am pleased that the Primary Languages Classroom Awards supports language developement to enable or children to be able to function on the world’s stage. Below is the article in full.

A survey of over 8,000 businesses released by the British Chambers of Commerce, shows that exporting activity continues to increase. However, the findings also suggest that providing firms with more training in foreign languages, and increasing their exposure to international companies would encourage more business owners to export. Economic growth relies upon British businesses being able to export more, so the British Chambers of Commerce is calling for more support for firms to help them trade internationally.

Language skills are vital to exporting

Knowledge of other languages is an important skill for exporters. 61% of non-exporters that are likely to consider trading internationally consider a lack of language skills as a barrier to doing so.

However, of those business owners that claim some language knowledge, very few can speak well enough to conduct deals in international markets. French is the most commonly spoken language, with 73% of business owners claiming some knowledge. However, only four percent are able to converse fluently enough in French to conduct business deals. This number drops significantly for those languages spoken in the fastest growing markets. In 2012, the IMF projects that the Chinese economy will grow by 9.5%, but just four percent of business owners claim any knowledge of the language, with less than one percent confident they could converse fluently.

Re-establishing foreign languages as core subjects within the UK national curriculum and in workplace training would mean that the next generation of business owners are ‘born global’ with language skills. The BCC is calling for the National Curriculum to be revised so that studying a foreign language is compulsory until AS level. Businesses could also be helped in training staff in new languages, if the government offered additional financial incentives such as tax credits for small and medium-sized businesses that make a significant investment in language training.

Businesses with stronger international connections are more likely to export

Businesses that do export are more likely to have stronger social connections with overseas markets. When asked what led them to export, the top three reasons cited by current exporters were:  collaboration with overseas partners (71%); a chance enquiry from outside the UK (57%); and previous work experience abroad (52%). Those business owners that have lived abroad are more likely to export. 11% of current exporters have lived aboard for five years or more.

The BCC believes that creating opportunities for employees to work in overseas companies could help expose firms to more international opportunities. For example, an international business exchange programme, perhaps modeled on the well-known academic Erasmus scheme would allow employees to complete placements in companies abroad, and bring back their experience to their employer. A scheme that covered BRIC economies, as well as Europe, would mean that businesses could take advantage of fast growing markets as well as the eurozone.

Commenting on the findings of the report, John Longworth, Director General of the British Chambers of Commerce (BCC), said:

“Exporting is good for Britain, so it is right that we should encourage current and future business owners to develop the necessary skills to trade overseas. We’re encouraged to see the percentage of firms exporting in our survey has increased from 22% in January 2011 to 32% in January 2012. Exports are equivalent to nearly 30% of UK GDP[1], but more can be done to help businesses take the first step to exporting. Encouraging companies to boost foreign language skills with incentives like tax credits is just one way of making sure we continue to export best of British products and services around the world. A renewed focus on language skills at school, as well as helping companies forge new connections overseas, could help ensure that current and future business owners are pre-disposed to thinking internationally.

“We are already the sixth largest trading nation on earth, and the third largest service exporter, but to really secure our future as a leading exporter we need to help companies take advantage of new markets. Giving businesses the opportunity to forge links with international firms, develop employees’ language skills, and providing compulsory education in languages for young people will transform many of the great businesses we have in the UK into success stories overseas.”

 

Do you need 700 reasons why you should learn a language?

For anyone who isn’t sure why you should learn a language or want to inform others of its importance the Centre for Languages, Lingustics and Area Studies or LLAS are building a data base with reasons and supporting information e.g. quotes or literary references to support this.

Find it at www.llas.ac.uk/700reasons

Here are a few.

Reason: 61Language learners can acquire the skills of critical analysis of stereotypes and prejudice in texts they read or seeReference:Byram, M., Gribkova, B., Starkey, H. (2002) Developing the Intercultural Dimension in Language Teaching: A Practical Introduction for Teachers (Strasbourg: Council of Europe)Related Keywords:Critical thinking, Values

Reason: 65High level plurilinguals as a group do better than corresponding monolinguals on tests measuring aspects of intelligence, creativity, divergent thinking, cognitive flexibility etc.Reference:Skutnabb-Kangas, T. (2002) Why should linguistic diversity be maintained and supported in Europe? Some arguments (Strasbourg: Council of Europe)Related Keywords:Academic skills, Creativity, Critical thinking, Learning, Multilingualism

Reason: 86One in every five British exporters (Statistics from Metra Martech) knows it is losing overseas business through its inability to overcome language and cultural differencesReference:Stevick, L. (2003) BCC Language Survey: The Impact of Foreign Languages on British Business – Part 1: The Qualitative Results (British Chambers of Commerce, November 2003)Related Keywords:Business

Reason: 87
Most businesses agree that their own business dealings are not significantly affected by lack of language skills, but there is widespread acknowledgment that it would certainly be ‘nice’ to be able to speak foreign languages and would likely be seen as a great compliment to their customers
Reference:
Stevick, L. (2003) BCC Language Survey: The Impact of Foreign Languages on British Business – Part 1: The Qualitative Results (British Chambers of Commerce, November 2003)
Related Keywords:
Business, Values
Reason: 20The ability to speak the language of another community provides an instrument which allows access to their culture; conversely, if other communities can speak your language, they have a powerful tool for accessing your communityReference:Willis, J. (2003) Foreign Language Learning and Technology in England from the 17th to 21st Centuries (a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the examination for PhD in the Department of Education at the University of Surrey)Related Keywords:Culture, Equality (equal opportunities)