Is the new OFSTED criteria and lesson observations creating even more mental health problems in schools?

The news story below hit a chord with me not only on a personal teacher level, but also as a consultant having worked in schools where not only one person lesson was judged inadequate, but the whole school. When schools are judged to be inadequate this same reaction holds true for the teacher in questions, the teachers as a whole, the auxiliary staff, the parents and the community.

The demotivating effect was instantaneous. I was so upset that I couldn’t go back into the classroom that afternoon. Instead, I went home and proceeded to do absolutely zero planning for the next day. For the rest of the week, my teaching was somewhat lacklustre because I was so wrung out by the distress of the observation. I felt ashamed of myself and unworthy of the responsibility of teaching a class of children. I started to feel overwhelmed by the possibility that I might be letting my students down. By the weekend, I was experiencing symptoms of anxiety.

http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/teacher-blog/2014/feb/15/secret-teacher-outstanding-inadequate-lesson-observations?CMP=new_54

This teacher was lucky as was I when a very similar incident happened to me. Thankfully a headteacher who knows the staff and school can make much better judgements.

At the time of my incident not only was I marked down by the lesson observer but was told to take a leaf out of one of my colleagues books. I was in disbelief, did he really mean the same colleague who before this planned pre-OFSTED observation had not planned but got myself and the head of department to do it for him, had the worst results of all of us and had the least respect of the students?

As you can imagine I did the same withdrew and wondered what to do, after a four page A4 handwritten letter to the headteacher and a subsequent interview I began to feel better, but all the time could not believe the system had let me and the school down so badly.

I keep reminding myself that, at the end of the day, I’m only in my second year of teaching. I will make mistakes in the classroom, miss things I should have picked up on and pitch the odd activity wrongly. But as long as my students are learning what they need to (and they are), my classroom is safe (and it is), and I am providing appropriate interventions for those children whose progress is less than ideal (which I am), then I know that I am doing my job – and doing it very well. Secret Teacher, Guardian

In my case I kept going for the students as for me that was why I was there, I believed in them and though sometimes I did things that were different (being the first female in the school teaching DT Resistant materials I had to sometimes), it was always about getting the best from my youngsters.

At the end of the year I was vindicated as my classes results were the best in the LA. To this day I have had no apology like the data protection act – everyone stood behind – it was what he saw in that 30 minute lesson! My classes results were also a shock in the wider area as we had many selective schools within our group, this gave me back my confidence.

Hence when this happened again a second time,  as before I had been observed by an external assessor as excellent then the next lesson observation made (by a consultant)  was equally as negative as the first about all aspects of the lesson, I could have been left thinking I was useless. What was equally interesting was the same lesson was observed weeks later by another teacher who didn’t change anything and they received a 1.  I realised the one thing that both the teachers who did really well had, that I didn’t, (and still don’t) is the gift of the gab. It was therefore at this point that I decided it was not worth worrying about as I knew my classes results were always the best, or in the top and that was my job.

Later on my confidence and experiences meant that I looked past lesson observation and looked for other things like genuine planning, understanding of curriculum areas, the rapport of the children and the work achieved to date, as well as observing over a period of time what is really happening in classrooms. In my consultants role to schools in Special Measures, serious weaknesses or needing improvement, I was always sad when the LA did not support the head, but used them as a scapegoat by sacking them. In my view this created even more confusion for everyone involved, it lowered the self-esteem of the whole building and anyone associated with it. It was like a fog over the whole area of the town.

Maybe this story will make people realise that one just one observation  can crush the very people we want to inspire and be role models to our learners, our parents and our communities. Using just one lesson observation as a yardstick for everything else is very dangerous. Having targets and expectations are great, but remember when writing or delivering any policy at the end of it there is a child or teacher doing their utmost.

As I go around schools now delivering EAL support I am very concerned that the new guidelines by OFSTED  (September  update) means that most schools will naturally fall by one grade due to the criteria. Where will it leave them?

These schools are doing the same as they always did, but suddenly they will find as it unravels that they are not at the top or are very close to needing some intervention. The only reason being because the criteria has changed, surely this isn’t a good enough reason to put more lives at risk of feeling inadequate, and all those mental health problem that then start feed into this system i.e. people with stress related illnesses, children self harming etc.

Only last week I was out with a group of people (supporting the national issue Time to change, Time to Talk). I began talking to one person who was at the time on their way to an appointment to their child’s school, they had been told their child will be excluded because they do not do failure. I was really surprised and ask for more detail but was then  horrified that  the school knew the child was self harming but their 99% pass rate was more important than the child just in case they had an OFSTED visit. Surely this is all the wrong way around, we have a duty to our children so lets start doing it.

What do you think?

SEND – what do these terms mean?

Special Needs has many different strands to it so below are just some examples of names we may hear from SEN and SEND co-ordinators but not fully understand.

Asperger’s Syndrome – Diagnosis is for those who have difficulty communicating, difficulty in social relationships and lack of understanding of how people feel.

Behavioural, Emotional and Social difficulty – is used for those whose behaviour, social and emotional difficulties present a barrier to learning and participation.

Bipolar Disorder – Bipolar people experience mood swings from periods of overactive, excited behaviour to deep depression.

Complex Learning Difficulties and disabilities – These conditions overlap and interlock creating a complex profile.

Dyslexia – Dyslexia sufferers have difficulty with the written word. It can affect reading, spelling, writing, memory and concentration.

Dyspraxia – This is a generic term to explain a range of movement difficulties.

Elective mutism – Those sufferers of this emotional disorder means that sometimes the person can speak fluently but it other situations they remain silent.

Multi-sensory Impairment – Those with MSI experience a combination of visual and hearing difficulties and whilst many think they are deaf/blind they could have some residual sight or hearing.

Semantic disorder – difficulty in understanding and using the meaning of words.

Specific Language Impairment – Difficulty in understanding and/ or using spoken language.

 

Why it is important to allow our children to learn a language for the world of work and their community.

For many Teachers especially those who are not specific language teachers they often do not see the benefit of our children learning languages, and or being bilingual, pluralingual etc. Below is an article which shows in the real world that they will inhabit i.e. the world of work where their dual langauge or langauge ability will make it possible for them to do what they enjoy and also help the local economy and community.

EspanolSeguros.com Connects Bilingual Insurance Agents With Hispanic Consumers

Espanol Seguros Has the Opportunity to Not Only Serve the US Hispanic Population, but Serve Other Spanish Speaking Countries in the International Community

WAKEFIELD, MA, Jun 05, 2012 (MARKETWIRE via COMTEX) — Espanol Seguros has announced that its portfolio of more than seventy Hispanic targeted domains across multiple verticals is reaching Hispanic consumers and allowing them to connect with bilingual insurance agents across the United States.

With multiple wage earners and an average household size of 4 people or more, along with increasing adoption rates, US Hispanics continue to be an attractive and profitable market segment for insurance companies, particularly auto insurance. As Andrew Laine, Founder of Spanish Insurance, LLC, explained during an interview with LatinVision on February 27, 2012, “There is nothing new about the lead generation industry, nor about creating educational content sites. What is innovative is our approach and our focus on the Hispanic community. Our goal is to serve the Hispanic consumers in a comfortable environment and to give insurance providers a way to reach our growing population.”

According to Hispanic Market Advisors, a recent study by the Pew Hispanic Center’s 2010 National Survey of Latinos, sixty-five percent of Latinos went online in 2012 and seventy-nine percent of those Hispanic Internet users use the Internet to research products before purchasing them and companies before doing business with them. By providing Hispanic consumers with an educational platform in Spanish and English, Espanol Seguros is positioning itself as a single stop website for Latinos aimed at connecting the Hispanic consumer to a national network of bilingual insurance agents ready to walk them through the insurance process. As Andrew Laine affirms, “There will always be one section of the Hispanic population that is growing faster than another, but all groups need insurance.”

If you’re a US Hispanic or Latino, have the preference to talk to an insurance agent who can speak your language, visit EspanolSeguros.com and get free quotes from insurance companies to start saving money on your insurance policies. If you’re an insurance agent looking to expand your customer base among Hispanics and boost your sales, contact Spanish Insurance to receive advertising opportunities.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/espanolseguroscom-connects-bilingual-insurance-agents-with-hispanic-consumers-2012-06-05

 

 

Nia Haf Jones Welsh Learners’ Medal – Wales UK

I love the Eisteddfod and really enjoyed as a child trying to enter the competitions and waiting for it to come to a town near me.  This did not happen until I was more of an adult but the love of poetry and singing is very much in my heart. It is therefore great to see a young person winning the Welsh Learners Medal….keeping Welsh alive.

The number of visitors was up from 20,083 on the second day of competing in  2011, and bigger than Monday’s attendance figure despite the poorer weather.

But speaking before presenting Nia Haf Jones with the Welsh Learners’ Medal  on the stage of the main pavilion, guest president and author Angharad Tomos  spoke of her hopes for the future of the language.

Read More http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/need-to-read/2012/06/05/urdd-eisteddfod-guest-president-speaks-of-language-hopes-at-learner-of-year-award-91466-31120672/#ixzz1x5socxdR

more excerpts:

“The Eisteddfod is good for giving children and young people confidence.

“But I’m not sure if they should put quite so much emphasis on competing.

“I know that that is the idea with an eisteddfod, but sometimes it would be  nice to have a festival where the children of Wales could get together to  play and discover things.”

 

 

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/need-to-read/2012/06/05/urdd-eisteddfod-guest-president-speaks-of-language-hopes-at-learner-of-year-award-91466-31120672/