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EAL or SEN? You decide

At last Rona and I have completed our handy practical guide to help and support you as teachers through the … are they just EAL or SEN or both? minefield.

Bang up to date with the curriculum and SEN changes for the 2014/15 academic year which sees the age range higher and the introduction of a new acronym SEMH which we will all have to be familiar with not just the SENCO or EAL TA.

 

 

A practical guide to supporting EAL and SEN learners

A practical guide to supporting EAL and SEN learners

Structured around current legislation it gives practical support to support you in your decision making as to whether they are naughty children just trying it on or have a need that is currently not supported.

Great for new teachers or experienced alike.

Contents page EAL SEN

Contents page EAL SEN

 

For a full copy of the SEND code go to –

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/342440/SEND_Code_of_Practice_approved_by_Parliament_29.07.14.pdf

For a copy of the e book priced at £15.00 (not including p and p) contact lsbooksinfo@gmail.com. Printed copies available soon.

back cover

 

Year 8 lesson Plan example for lesson 2 – Creative writing – The Granny project

A  SCHOOL                  SCHOOL LOGO

 

Group Year 8 Class T                                                 Date ____21 May ________

 

 

Unit Of Work.  20 Century Drama
Teaching Aim. 

 

To continue to understand the play The Granny ProjectObjectives for board:

To write for a specified audience

 

Learning Outcomes.  (Differentiate learning outcomes  into All pupils will, Most pupils will and Some pupils will). 

All pupils will complete a task

Most pupils will present imaginative work for display

Some pupils will develop ideas

Lesson Content. 

 

 

Main Activity(ies)

 

 

 

 

 

Brain bloom words appropriate for an elderly audience    10 mins 

 

 

Re-read part of the Granny Project

Choose an audience and re-write the play for the specified audience eg, for the elderly, choice of words, longer, flowery old fashioned, bosh to wash in, Frock dress                             35 mins

 

 

 Differentiation

 

 Use of dictionaries, thesaurus, working in pairs

 

  

Extension Work.

 

  

Edit their work, extending sentences using connectives

 

 Plenary

 

 

 

 Share ideas with class                                                      15 mins
  The text Paper Exercise books
LSA (How do LSA’s contribute to the learning process). Not present
Assessment (What strategies are you using to assess learning). Competition 
Key words  Presentation Content Audience
Basic Skills.Literacy, numeracy ICT. R 6 W11
 Date Due Sam Learning (or other ICT resource/platform that creates homework) Homework – Writing 

Friday 28th of May

Example lesson Plan 3 Year 9 Set 2 (2) – Creative writing

 

A SCHOOL                        SCHOOL LOGO

 

Group Year 9 Set 2                                                                 Date __19 May __________

 

 

Unit Of Work.  Creative Writing
Teaching Aim. 

 

To develop writing in preparation for GCSEObjective for board:

Understand and use brain blooming and mind mapping

To write a brief for a publisher

Learning Outcomes.  (Differentiate learning outcomes  into All pupils will, Most pupils will and Some pupils will). 

All pupils will attempt the tasks

Most pupils will develop a style of writing that is appropriate

Some pupils will  write accurately and with imagination

Lesson Content. 

Main Activity(ies)

 

 

 

 

 

Brain blooming – generate a list of ideas that could be an inspiration for a story – eg famous people, acts of heroism etc                                                                                                  10 Mins

Introduce mind mapping and its conceptual use.                5 mins

Use mind mapping to generate story ideas and plots        30 Mins

Discuss genres

Mind map descriptive words

Place

Feelings

Characters

Interaction

Create a brief for a publisher                                                10 mins

The brief should include: The target audience, brief outline of story, interesting points eg local history, factual content etc

 

Differentiation  Introduce scaffolding, differentiation by negotiation and outcome 
 Extension Work.

 

 Connectives for complex sentences

 

 Plenary

 

 Discuss and share ideas                                                         5 Mins
 Resources Interactive whiteboard, examples of mind maps, colouring pencils
LSA (How do LSA’s contribute to the learning process). No present
Assessment (What strategies are you using to assess learning). GCSE criteria 
Key words  Mind mapping, audience, brief, publisher
Basic Skills.Literacy, numeracy ICT. W 7 Sn2, 5 Wr 5
  

Date Due

H/W  Research two different characters from two novels.  Write a description of them and their background. 1 A4 sheet minimumTuesday the 25th of May

Lesson Plan Example 2 – Year 9 Set 2 Creative writing

A SCHOOL                        SCHOOL LOGO

 

Group Year9/ Set3                                                                  Date __17 May __________

 

 

Unit Of Work.  Creative Writing
Teaching Aim.   To develop writing in preparation for GCSE Objective for board:  To respond to the marking in your books, to understand GCSE requirements for higher tier, To begin preparation for Original writing coursework and be aware of the need to write to a certain audience.
Learning Outcomes.  (Differentiate learning outcomes  into All pupils will, Most pupils will and Some pupils will).All pupils will attempt the tasks

Most pupils will develop a style of writing that is appropriate

Some pupils will write accurately and with imagination

Lesson Content.  

 

Main Activity(ies)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Differentiation

 

 

 

Read the comments re. My Marking and respond.         Give out books and folders.  Write date, title, C/W and objective.

Students put names on.                                                      10 mins

 Write a review about reading week. 2 paragraphs min   15 mins

 

Read GCSE Guidance sheets.                                             10 mins

Begin GCSE coursework – Original writing

Think about books previously read in primary school Name them, author and genre.  Why was it good ?   At least 3              10 mins

Begin preparation for Original writing Talk about what they learnt from having an author in school

Who is his audience? What kind of audience does he write for?

Who will you write for?                                                         10 mins

 

 

Some of the class will need ideas to start their writing

 

 

 

Extension Work.  Brain bloom ideas for audience
Plenary  

 

Review GCSE requirements.  Give examples of audiences. 5 mins
  Paper, folders, books, Tony Buzan example of Mind Maps
LSA (How do LSA’s contribute to the learning process). None present
Assessment (What strategies are you using to assess learning). GCSE criteria 
Key words  Audience
Basic Skills.Literacy, numeracy ICT. W 7 Sn2, 5 Wr 5
 Date Due None set  

Sherlock Holmes Worksheet

Just a little cloze exercise that I used with my students.

Mr Sherlock Holmes

In the year _________ I took my degree of ___________ of Medicine of the University of London, and proceeded to Netley to go through the course prescribed for surgeons in the _________________. Having completed my studies there. I was duly attached to the Fifth Northumberland Fusiliers as assistant _____________. The regiment was stationed in India at the time, and before I could join it, the second Afghan war had broken out. On landing at ____________, I learned that my ____________ had advanced through the passes, and was already deep in the _____________ country. I followed, however, with many officers who were in the same situation as myself, and succeeded in reaching Candahar in __________, where I found my ________, and at once entered upon my new duties. The campaign brought ___________ and promotion to many, but for me it had nothing but ________and ___________. I was removed from my brigade and attached to the Berkshires, with whom I served at the fatal battle of Maiwand. There I was struck on the shoulder by a Jezail _______________, which shattered the bone and grazed the subclavian ____________. I should have fallen into the hands of the __________ Ghazis had it not been for the devotion and __________ shown by Murray, my orderly, who threw me across a __________, and succeeded in bringing me safely to the ___________lines.

Doctor       corps       safety       enemy’s       regiment       disaster       bullet       murderous       courage       artery       pack-horse       British       misfortune       1878       surgeon       Bombay       honours       Army

Full text with the inserted words italicised.

In the year  1878   I took my degree of Doctor  of Medicine of the University of London, and proceeded to Netley to go through the course prescribed for surgeons in the Army. Having completed my studies there. I was duly attached to the Fifth Northumberland Fusiliers as assistant surgeon The regiment was stationed in India at the time, and before I could join it, the second Afghan war had broken out. On landing at Bombay  I learned that my regiment had advanced through the passes, and was already deep in the murderous country. I followed, however, with many officers who were in the same situation as myself, and succeeded in reaching Candahar in safety , where I found my corps , and at once entered upon my new duties. The campaign brought honours and promotion to many, but for me it had nothing but  disaster and misfortune . I was removed from my brigade and attached to the Berkshires, with whom I served at the fatal battle of Maiwand. There I was struck on the shoulder by a Jezail  bullet , which shattered the bone and grazed the subclavian artery. I should have fallen into the hands of the  enemy’s Ghazis had it not been for the devotion and  courage shown by Murray, my orderly, who threw me across a pack-horse, and succeeded in bringing me safely to the  British lines.

Benefits of Bilingualism

Brilliant post that explains some of the benefits of bilingualism. They include;

1. A conscious approach can help you clean up your writing and your speech and help you communicate more clearly.

2. Bilingual individuals can pick out a speaker’s voice easier

3. Develop creativity because learning a second language improved speakers’ planning, cognitive flexibility, and working memory, three pillars on which creativity is built.

4. Patients who spoke more than one language had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s four years after their monolingual counterparts.

and finally

5. Make smarter decisions as people thinking in a foreign language were more likely to consider a question more slowly and analytically than in their native language 

Really interesting thanks to http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dan-roitman/why-it-makes-more-sense-t_b_3435076.html for this story.

Recent research suggests that learning a new language, at any age, not only will enhance your next vacation or better prepare you for an upcoming business trip, it can also make you a better listener, boost your creativity, spur brain growth, and for some people, even delay Alzheimer’s.

Each of these benefits stems from the various ways that language learning improves your brain’s ability to focus. Learning a language physically changes your mind, ultimately making you a stronger, more creative thinker. Here are five reasons why you should start learning a foreign language right now:

1. To improve your communication skills. The key here is consciousness. While most of us rarely think about the grammatical structures of our native tongue, learning a second language brings them into stark relief. When attempting to write or speak in a second language, you suddenly have to focus more on the order of words, your verb tenses, and parts of speech. And in recognizing how sentences are constructed in a second language, you can become more aware of how they’re arranged in your first language. That more conscious approach can help you clean up your writing and your speech and help you communicate more clearly.

2. To become a better listener. A study at Northwestern University showed that bilingual individuals could better pick out a speaker’s voice amidst distracting noises. This superior “attention, inhibition, and encoding of sound,” as the researchers put it, can help you better focus on what a client, boss, or employee is saying. The ability to listen closely is a valuable skill that can translate into a real dollar value. Look at IKEA, which attributes its record 2012 revenues and growing appeal in part to its ability to listen to customers and then respond accordingly.

3. To boost your creativity. Every time you speak a second language is an exercise in creativity. While words in your native language might string themselves together naturally, requiring little effort on your part, constructing sentences and meaning in a second language often requires more conscious thought. A study published last year found that learning a foreign language enhanced people’s fluency, elaboration, originality, and flexibility, the four scales measured by the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking. Researchers concluded that learning a second language improved speakers’ planning, cognitive flexibility, and working memory, three pillars on which creativity is built.

4. To sharpen your mind. Learning a second language can beef up your brain’s executive control center — the hub that helps manage your cognitive processes. A second language offers a strong exercise regimen for the executive control center, ultimately making it more efficient. Bilingualism can keep this center strong even as you age. In a study of 24 million dementia patients worldwide, many of whom also had Alzheimer’s, researchers found that the patients who spoke more than one language had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s four years after their monolingual counterparts.

5. To make smarter decisions. A study completed last year showed that people thinking in a foreign language were more likely to consider a question more slowly and analytically than in their native language. It seems that thinking in your native tongue is often associated with breezy, emotional decision-making that reveals natural biases. But when considering the same problem in a non-native tongue, subjects in the study demonstrated “enhanced deliberation” based more on cold hard logic. So the next time you have to make a big decision, you might get a better outcome if you consider it in a language other than your own.

As a language learner, you’ll not only become a more conscious thinker and listener who can communicate clearly and think creatively, but you’ll also gain the most significant benefit of multilingualism: a broader, more global perspective. Each of the five benefits outlined above show that learning another language really does reshape the way we think, helping us better empathize and communicate with customers, partners, and employees by adopting, through language, a new way to see the world.

Lessons to be learnt – How much trust should we give EAL TAs?

Lessons to be learnt How much trust do we give EAL TAs?

After observing some planning and teacher training in London last week the following occurred to me not as way of criticism but more as reflective practice and moving learning in the classroom along.

Clearly we should not give any teacher or TA (Teaching Assistant) 100% trust until we have assured ourselves that they are giving 100% correct instruction. As no teacher is a super teacher i.e.  never needing support, mentoring or guidance then why should we give EAL TAs (English as a second language Teaching Assistants) this trust and change policies to suit them?
Don’t  get me wrong I think TA’s and EAL TA’s in particular are great but we should not implicitly trust them to guide our youngsters in the ETHOS of the school, the teaching of academic concepts and language and assessment without having an overview of their abilities and skills ourselves as senior managers and governors.
I watched a situation recently where a group of excellent teachers were planning and talking about the use of technology available to support maths teaching. They were thinking really creatively about how they could teach in their classrooms (and not looking at a withdrawal group) a mathematical concept that the rest of the year were  learning. For me it was brilliant they were marrying their skills with technology to save time for them when planning and delivering, but increasing the children’s learning ability whilst making it interesting.

All went well until the TA that supports them became part of the discussion and within no time suddenly the TA had convinced them the group needed to be withdrawn and that it could take time for the children to learn it. What struck me most as an observer was that I had been in that situation many times but could see now that the TA  was steering our teaching. Today seeing it this way made me wonder what made these excellent practitioners take another persons word and run with it?

Why didn’t they question or try out their theory and review it if it didn’t work? They had built a translation requirement in, their practice was excellent, their topic was interesting, their own personal understanding of the concept was excellent and yet they let someone without the same or better credentials influence them and their decisions.

Something worth pondering on.

bilingual students with proficiency in both mother tongue and English outperformed students who were proficient in only one of either mother tongue or English, even when the bilingual students came from less-resourced schools

An interesting report about bilingualism in South Africa. Here are the highlights.

However, “multilingualism as a pervasive feature of the South African identity is something yet to be realised and, although learners are expected to be able to use English as the official language of learning, many are excluded from it”,

“According to the Caps [new curriculum] document, the first additional language is used for certain communicative functions in a society, meaning it is merely a medium of learning and teaching in education,” he said. The home language, on the other hand, is a tool of cultural preservation and articulation.

Ultimately, South Africa should transform through encouraging bilingualism in all levels and spheres of society, Dampier said. “If we are to proclaim a truly multilingual South African identity, we must stop viewing English as a tool for communication in the global village, business and education,” he said. It should rather be seen as an essential part of South African identity.

The Gauteng strategy aims to improve reading and writing and to change teacher practice. But, said Botha, “we have had a plethora of policies and curricula, and yet reading and writing remain a problem”.

She identified three factors that impede progress: the morale of teachers; the lack of teaching and learning programmes for them; and the new curriculum

http://mg.co.za/article/2013-03-22-tongue-tied-on-language-policy